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Fluorspar

Latest News

  • PRICING NOTICE: Proposal to discontinue selected fluorspar prices

    Monday, 18 June 2018

    Industrial Minerals is opening a market consultation to seek feedback on its proposal to discontinue several fluorspar prices.

  • IM Congress 2018: What we learned

    Thursday, 14 June 2018

    Here are some takeaways from the 24th IM Congress 2018 in Barcelona, Spain, that took place over June 5-7.

  • Price Briefing: June 1-7

    Friday, 08 June 2018

    Cheaper material offered by smaller producers weigh on Chinese battery-grade lithium carbonate, hydroxide prices; European antimony trioxide market softens on lack of sales; PRICING NOTICE: Discontinuation of celestite; PRICING NOTICE: Discontinuation of olivine price; Fresh talk about consolidation of Liaoning province's magnesia sector but prices steady for now; PRICING NOTICE: Discontinuation of kyanite pricing; China fluorspar prices push higher while sellers wait for stronger prices; No movement on Chinese soda ash price despite restored supply sources

  • China fluorspar prices push higher while sellers wait for stronger prices

    Friday, 08 June 2018

    Volatility continues in the Chinese fluorspar market, with supply views mixed elsewhere.

More from Latest News

Pricing News

  • PRICING NOTICE: Proposal to discontinue selected fluorspar prices

    Monday, 18 June 2018

    Industrial Minerals is opening a market consultation to seek feedback on its proposal to discontinue several fluorspar prices.

  • Price Briefing: June 1-7

    Friday, 08 June 2018

    Cheaper material offered by smaller producers weigh on Chinese battery-grade lithium carbonate, hydroxide prices; European antimony trioxide market softens on lack of sales; PRICING NOTICE: Discontinuation of celestite; PRICING NOTICE: Discontinuation of olivine price; Fresh talk about consolidation of Liaoning province's magnesia sector but prices steady for now; PRICING NOTICE: Discontinuation of kyanite pricing; China fluorspar prices push higher while sellers wait for stronger prices; No movement on Chinese soda ash price despite restored supply sources

  • China fluorspar prices push higher while sellers wait for stronger prices

    Friday, 08 June 2018

    Volatility continues in the Chinese fluorspar market, with supply views mixed elsewhere.

  • IM's May Price Movements

    Tuesday, 05 June 2018

    IM's monthly price movements.

More from Pricing News

Features

  • 2017: The year of the supply squeeze

    Thursday, 14 December 2017

    If 2016 should be remembered with a shudder, then 2017 will be remembered as the year when it became harder to source minerals. The supply situation changed for many minerals in the markets that Industrial Minerals covers, not least because many producers were simply shut down by strict environmental laws in China, or found it harder to source materials due to demand-side challenges, consultant editor Siobhan Lismore-Scott writes.

  • A Chinese squeeze? Fluorspar industry governed by uncertainty

    Friday, 29 September 2017

    China is the largest producer and consumer of fluorspar, but supply has been curtailed due to draconian environmental legislation, which has pushed up prices. Will this give new producers in Vietnam, Canada and Afghanistan a chance to swoop in and further alter the supply mix? IM Consultant Editor, Siobhan Lismore-Scott, reports.

More from Features

Market Brief

Fluorspar is the commercial name for fluorite, a form of calcium fluoride (CaF2). Pure fluorite contains 51.3% calcium and 48.7% fluorine.

Fluorite is the primary source of fluorine, however relatively minor sources of fluorine include cryolite (Na3AlF6), sellaite (MgF2), topaz (Al2SiO4[F,OH]2), villiaumite (NaF), bastnasite ([Ce,La][CO3]F), and fluorapatite (Ca 5[PO4,CO3]3F).

Naturally occurring cryolite, used in the aluminium smelting process, has largely been replaced by synthetic cryolite.

Fluorspar may be found in a range of geological environments, such as hydrothermal and sedimentary, associated with barytes, calcium carbonate, galena, pyrite, quartz and sphalerite.

Fluorspar grades are categorised on the basis of CaF2 content. Major grades produced include:

Other grades include:

Another source of fluorine is fluosilicic acid (FSA), made as a by-product from the processing of phosphate rock into phosphoric acid for the fertiliser industry. FSA for its fluorine content has primarily been used as a water additive, particularly in the USA.

Supply

The world's identified resource of fluorspar is approximately 500m tonnes contained. However, if reserves of fluorine present in phosphate rock are also considered, then this adds a further 1.29bn tonnes of fluorspar (or 630m. tonnes of fluorine).

South Africa is the single largest holder of these reserves (18%) with 41m tonnes of fluorite reserves, followed by Mexico (14%) with 32m tonnes, China (9%) reporting 21m tonnes, and Mongolia (5%) having 12m tonnes.















Nearly 49% of the reserves are not commercially mined or produced.




World fluorspar production capacity is about 6.3m tpa (2012), and is dominated by China (50%) and Mexico (18%), followed by smaller production in Mongolia (7%) and South Africa (3%). Countries including Russia, Namibia and Spain account for 2% each, while Kenya and Morocco contribute 1% individually.














World's major fluorspar producers include:

Mexichem – Mexico

Steyuan Mineral Resources Group – China

Mongolrostsvetmet LLC – Mongolia/Russia (JV)

Minersa – Spain

Kenya Fluorspar – Kenya

Vergenoeg Mining Company – South Africa

Masan Resources – Vietnam

British Fluorspar – United Kingdom

Markets







There are two principal grades of fluorspar, which are defined based on the CaF2 content of the material. Metallurgical (and ceramic) grade fluorspar contains ≤97% CaF2, while acid grade fluorspar contains ≥97% CaF2.

Metspar is primarily sold as a flux into markets for iron and steel casting and steelmaking.












Source: Ray Will, IM Fluorspar Conference 2011



Acidspar is the raw material for hydrofluoric acid (HF) and thus for all fluorochemicals, in addition to being an important feedstock for aluminium fluoride (captive) and other markets (such as welding rods).

Around 60% of fluorspar produced in 2008 was classed as acid grade, with the balance classed as metallurgical grade.